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Old 07-05-2018, 10:20 PM
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Arunesh Arunesh is offline
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Default A humble enquiry

Hello,

Hope all's well with the community. I am fairly new to Logic puzzles (infact fairly new to all sorts of logic puzzles/quizzes.. even advanced arithmetic). So my question is does everyone start out slow and eventually get better with deliberate practice? That is all.
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Old 07-05-2018, 10:43 PM
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fromalabama fromalabama is offline
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The short answer is yes.
The longer answer is that speed and improvement are relative, so some people probably start out pretty fast and some pretty slow, and improvement due to practice will vary. One person might start out really slow and improve quickly, others may start out fast and not get much faster for a while. The slow starters might eventually surpass the quick starters; people will plateau at different levels, and even then might have a 'eureka' moment and suddenly get a lot better (like when you figure out a new way to understand a certain type of clue).
Also, I don't think anyone can say for certain that everyone gets better as they do more, although that would be expected in the vast majority of cases (assuming they don't get one of the GPS puzzles early on and just quit). It's pretty safe to assume that you yourself will get better if you continue practicing.
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Old 07-05-2018, 11:15 PM
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Arunesh Arunesh is offline
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Yes that makes sense. Thank you for your time and kind encouragement.
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Old 07-26-2018, 10:36 AM
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pidgeon92 pidgeon92 is offline
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I asked a very similar question in this thread, and got a lot of good responses.

https://www.logic-puzzles.org/forum/...ead.php?t=1157

I'm still not very fast at solving them, but I end up in the average column a lot now. I like doing the 4x5 challenging puzzles most often.
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Old 07-27-2018, 10:44 PM
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Arunesh Arunesh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pidgeon92 View Post
I asked a very similar question in this thread, and got a lot of good responses.

https://www.logic-puzzles.org/forum/...ead.php?t=1157

I'm still not very fast at solving them, but I end up in the average column a lot now. I like doing the 4x5 challenging puzzles most often.
Thank you for this!
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:38 AM
Ella Ella is online now
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I got a lot quicker at first with practice -- some things just became easier with practice: seeing the size/range of the scale on the first square, for instance. I now know exactly how many squares to X out when the intervals are 18 or 32 etc, which took me a second or two (and some big mistakes) earlier on.

I do find that unless I'm willing to sit and tackle various new "tricks" to achieve a deeper level of understanding or find a new "trick" to work a puzzle, I will basically stay at the same pace forever. IOW, all the practice in the world won't help me unless I'm willing to actually understand the logic and math behind the clues and grids.

I take my time sometimes and really try to work things out (in fact, I'm here today to ask a question in search of another level of proficiency) but often I just want to relax, so I do my puzzles and don't get much faster. I could probably do them forever, and I wouldn't get much faster than I am now unless I went deeper into the methods, math and logic behind it all.

Some things inevitably will speed up. Learn those Dutch names (or like me, create easier sounding names for common clues) and you will get faster. But there will be a plateau unless something else gives.

The best place to move your "game" ahead is this one: https://www.logic-puzzles.org/how-to...gic-puzzle.php That page will take you step by step from the most basic to the more detailed concepts. It won't always teach you the tricks, but it will teach you how to solve the puzzles found here.

Once you're sure you understand all of those things, there are wonderful people here willing to hang in and teach some tricks for visually solving things that otherwise seem impenetrable, but it's very fun at first just to keep at it and watch your scores improve. Have fun puzzling!
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:59 AM
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MaryJaneBaker MaryJaneBaker is offline
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That's a very interesting question, Arunesh. I am new to Logic puzzles, but I've been doing logic quizzes for quite a long time. When I started doing it, I was extremely slow and was upset that I can't do it faster, I really wanted to give it up, but then just did more and more practice and my skills got better and better. So practice is a key to success. Just keep on going and everything's gonna be cool
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:35 PM
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MHS16 MHS16 is offline
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I found playing the puzzles on paper to be very helpful. In addition to the physical crossing out / checking off, it helped me write notes that i could see at the same time as the clues, underline important things, etc.
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