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Old 01-29-2014, 12:44 PM
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Default How to Solve a Logic Puzzle

We've put together a new, in-depth tutorial that covers all the basics of grid-based logic puzzles, as well as many intermediate- and advanced-level solving techniques. Any feedback on the tutorial would be greatly appreciated.

The tutorial can be found here:
http://logic-puzzles.org/how-to-solv...gic-puzzle.php

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 01-29-2014, 01:41 PM
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These tutorials are a great idea - they explain so much more in depth than it's possible to do with just the hints. Clicked around the various subheadings and through their steps, and everything seems to be functioning perfectly so far.
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Old 01-30-2014, 02:36 AM
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Default Admin a mistake in Either or clues description slide # 3

Hi admin I am sorry to point out that the description in Either or clues slide #3 is wrong and misleading. I post what it says here: Slide #3
Just like the "neither/nor" clue, an "either/or" clue implies that the two items (Laura and $40) being discussed in relation to the third (Pisces) are separate entities. The Pisces can be either Laura's tattoo or the one that cost $40 - we don't know which of the two it is, but we know it definitely cannot be both.

Therefore we know that Laura's tattoo didn't cost $40, and we can mark an X on the grid where those two options intersect.

I will highlight the misleading part.

In my opinion it should read as follows: The Pisces can be Laura's tattoo or NOT Laura's tattoo, and the $40 is Laura's tattoo or NOT Laura's tattoo. Therefore The PISCES tattoo and the $40 are false. That is all the deduction we can infer.

Stan
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Old 01-30-2014, 05:43 AM
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Thanks Stan! You're absolutely right - the text for that slide is fixed now.
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Old 01-30-2014, 05:54 AM
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Cool

No problem Admin
IMO the rest of the help makes sense to me. No other misleads. No charge for proof reading.

Stan

PS Now I am going to try to beat my record time of 19mins for a 4x5 challenge type.
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Old 01-30-2014, 10:57 AM
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"Comparative Relationships" Slide #4: If Wilma's tattoo is $10 more than the red one

That should read: If Wilma's tattoo is $10 LESS than the red one
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Old 01-30-2014, 11:02 AM
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"Transitive Relationships (Either/Or)" Slide #1

Since $40 is already false for Isaac, it must be true for orange. Get rid of that "X" and the tutorial plays out correctly.
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Old 01-30-2014, 11:08 AM
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Hi Bill you are correct Sir. You have a keener eye than mine. I also spotted while checking that in the same explanation it incorrectly says that gemini is greater than Red instead of lesser than red.
Here it is:

If Wilma's tattoo is $10 more than the red one, and the Gemini tattoo is $5 more than the red one, then Wilma's tattoo can't be equal to the Gemini tattoo. They are both different "distances" away from the same item ("red tattoo") in relation to price - therefore they are different entities.

Stan
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Old 01-30-2014, 11:25 AM
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"Transitive Relationships (Unaligned Pair)"

I'd like to see more on the power of Unaligned Pairs. While your example does a good example of showing the transitive relationship as a solving method, Slide #7 does a poor job of showing off cross eliminations.

In an Unaligned Pair clue such as the one given, the intersection of "Zachary" and "Aquarius" become the center of a cross elimination that affects "Blue" and "$40". That box is "Sign-Name". For all Names eliminated by "Aquarius" and all Signs eliminated by "Zachary", neither "Blue" nor "$40" can be those values.

Thus "Zachary/Aquarius" points to "Bonita" and "Taurus". Eliminate both "Bonita" and "Taurus" from the possible values of "Blue" and the possible values of "$40".

If you weren't pointing out the transitive technique, you could have used cross eliminations by showing that "Blue/$40" points to "Orange", "Violet", "$45", $50", "$60", and eliminate those 5 values from each of "Zachary" and "Aquarius".
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Old 01-30-2014, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsBayou View Post
"Comparative Relationships" Slide #4: If Wilma's tattoo is $10 more than the red one

That should read: If Wilma's tattoo is $10 LESS than the red one
Absolutely right - fixed it now, thanks!
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