#11  
Old 02-02-2014, 09:24 PM
Alethea's Avatar
Alethea Alethea is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 39
Default

It's fun to see how each of us have different goals and how some of them relate to competing against others, while some of them are against ourselves. That's what makes these kinds of games so challenging - there's no competition like pushing yourself to exceed your last best effort! I am excited to say that I've accomplished my goal of at least 5 record-breaking times in all puzzle sizes except the 4x7. But I'm working on it! Maybe, after this, I'll try to play often and well enough to earn a trophy somehow.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-03-2014, 03:49 AM
sunrise sunrise is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 13
Default

it's also fascinating to watch the skill progression, the more you play the better you get
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-03-2014, 08:15 AM
stanstar's Avatar
stanstar stanstar is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland at present UK
Posts: 127
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sadiagardezis View Post
how abt people doing a 4x7 easy puzzle in 53 seconds ????? lol
Really? Did you see that record? Amazing time. How can anyone read the clues so fast, understanding the clues and filling in the grid in 53 seconds? Who was the member? Can you remember? I would love to watch a video of them doing it, that would be interesting wouldn't it?

Stan
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-03-2014, 08:33 AM
Alethea's Avatar
Alethea Alethea is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 39
Default

Some of the times truly are impressive! One thing that can shave off several minutes is to attempt to only work in the top section of squares (the first row of blocks across the top - you know, the ones that must be filled before your solution can be submitted). It's easier to do this with some puzzles than with others, but it can really shorten your time!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-03-2014, 10:40 AM
stanstar's Avatar
stanstar stanstar is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland at present UK
Posts: 127
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alethea View Post
Some of the times truly are impressive! One thing that can shave off several minutes is to attempt to only work in the top section of squares (the first row of blocks across the top - you know, the ones that must be filled before your solution can be submitted). It's easier to do this with some puzzles than with others, but it can really shorten your time!
Hi Alethia, how can that be done? Because some clues are given that have to be x'd out below that top grid? I have had some puzzles that ONLY have clues which can be x'd out below the top grid. If you can give an example of doing what you say I would be pleased to see it myself.

I always have to write the clues down on paper which are the Toby bought the hat 1 day before Sam bought his item. Also I write down the Of A and B one is C and the other is D kind. I even write down the clues like: Tony is either London or the Blue hat.
It looks obvious that the record solvers don't write anything down. How that can be done I know not. Maybe the record holders can clarify this for the slower solvers?

Stan
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-03-2014, 01:41 PM
Alethea's Avatar
Alethea Alethea is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 39
Default

Hi, Stan
I think it's mainly practice. Most puzzles can be done only in the top row if the clues are filled in there first, skipping clues that only pertain to the lower rows. Eventually, even the lower-row clues have limited possibilities in the top, and the answers become more obvious. Also, rather than writing things down, it seems to work to fill in what you can, as you can. Order is not important, as the clues and answers have a way of working themselves out as you go on.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-03-2014, 03:09 PM
uigrad's Avatar
uigrad uigrad is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 38
Default

I agree with Alethea that this helps tremendously for me getting my times down.

There's a trick to doing it, and it's simply to use memory for stuff that isn't in the top section. Instead of marking clues in the other sections, I'll commit them to memory whenever possible. There's probably a lot of other things you need to learn first before you can start doing that though.

When I first started doing these puzzles, I would read that "Between A & B, one is C, and one is D". I would start to apply this to my chart, and then forget what I was doing in the middle. I had to look back at the clue to remember what I was doing.

Once I corrected that, then I began working on doing that flawlessly without errors. I trained my eyes to just see "A" "B" "C" "D", and not think to hard about the rest of the words.

After that, I finally began to restrict myself to just the grids in the top (as Alethea suggested). This is further extension of my memory. If a clue says that Chris paid less than person who got soda, I mark that Chris is not in the bottom row, and soda is not in the top row, but I don't mark that "Chris is not soda". Instead, I simply commit it to memory.

I can use this technique for easy 3x4 puzzles. And, I've recently gotten so that I can use it for many 4x4 easy puzzles (but not all, some have a lot of clues outside of the top area). I can't use it for 4x5 or larger yet. My memory is just not good enough.

It's for this reason that I stick with 4x4 easy puzzles (and smaller) when I'm going for points. Getting points requires speed. As much fun as larger puzzles are, I can't compete on them, because my speed isn't there.

Stan, I'd recommend going back to 3x4 puzzles and just working on them for a while, until you get fast at them. They may begin to get boring after a while, but since memorization is easier on them, you'll probably increase your speed the fastest by practicing with them.

Also, it is worth mentioning that if you click on a clue, then it goes away. If I get a clue that I can put in the chart completely (ie. A and B and C and D are all different customers), then I do mark them in the chart (even if they are not in the top portion), and then click on the clue, so I don't have to look at it any more. I only try to memorize the clues that can't be fully represented in the chart anyway.

Last edited by uigrad; 02-03-2014 at 03:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-03-2014, 04:15 PM
Quiltbee's Avatar
Quiltbee Quiltbee is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1
Default

I played like a maniac for a couple of months three years ago or so. Lots of it is just practice, the more you play the faster you can fill in the grid.

With the old site, there were lots of puzzles that were essentially the same in structure, just the story and the names were different. I have an elephant's memory, and I soon started recognizing patterns. After a while I knew which clues I had to look at first to see the pattern emerge. And that is exactly the reason why I stopped playing... I could solve many puzzles really fast but it just got boring. So I am happy to see the new site

What I did though was print some of the puzzles and challenge myself to solve them just filling in the top section. It is not necessary to fill in the whole grid to solve a puzzle, it is just helpful because it makes it easier to see things. So in the end it all comes down to practice, I guess.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-04-2014, 06:04 AM
stanstar's Avatar
stanstar stanstar is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland at present UK
Posts: 127
Default

My thanks to Alethia, uigrad and QuiltB for the advice given above. I'll try to put into practice the above tips.

Stan
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-04-2014, 10:35 AM
sadiagardezis sadiagardezis is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 11
Default

stanstar i have not only seen it with my own eyes but many times.all i keep thinking is mensa club is here
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

About Puzzle Baron

The Puzzle Baron family of web sites has served millions and millions of puzzle enthusiasts since its inception in 2006. From cryptograms to acrostics, logic puzzles to drop quotes, patchwords to wordtwist and even sudoku, we run the gamut in word puzzles, printable puzzles and logic games.