#1  
Old 05-10-2013, 03:01 PM
CatDog CatDog is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
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Default Feels hopeless

As soon as I start reading a new premise, the previous bits of information in the other premises are lost instantly. I have to reread every single premise in order to refresh my memory. Sometimes I can see visual patterns that allow me to ignore the premises for a while as I analyze the grid itself.

I've noticed a few problems about my brain.

I had a psychological evaluation a few years ago that included an intelligence test. I had a 30 point difference between my performance and verbal scores. While my verbal score was in the 70th percentile, my working memory hurt it quite significantly. Performance was in the 'superior' range (about 85-90th I think). I recall that my working memory was in one of the lower percentiles, say, 50th or so.

Is my working memory not good enough to excel at these puzzles?

I've intentionally avoided all guides that explain how to solve the <50% puzzles. I feel stupid if I cannot find the solutions myself. I've given up at sudoku after I found myself hitting time barriers for various difficulties. On my iPhone I'd solve the hard/harder/difficult ones and I could never break 4-5 minutes. I notice that I cannot easily exclude irrelevant information since my eyes have a tendency to scan very fast in order to brute-force. I think I try to compensate for my lack of logic-oriented sort of thinking by using a different approach.

I think my brain is the sort that is very adept at solving jigsaw puzzles, not logic puzzles. As a kid, I remember loving to visit beaches because I'd scan the sand for small bits of shells, rocks, and assorted debris. I was very good at pouring out a bucket of Lego and locating the elements I needed without much effort.

Perhaps my issues arise from the puzzles being mainly in words? Maybe I'm cognitively f*cked?

Last edited by CatDog; 05-10-2013 at 03:03 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-11-2013, 03:47 AM
jonneez jonneez is offline
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If I am you I would not do suicide because this happens. Is bad idea
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  #3  
Old 05-13-2013, 09:02 AM
CatDog CatDog is offline
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http://imgur.com/CK6NZTJ

Small success. I will continue on; quitting is just too boring.
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  #4  
Old 05-13-2013, 06:16 PM
Quazar Quazar is offline
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FWIW I don't rely on memory very much at all with these puzzles. I know it's the key to getting a good score, digesting the clues into either the grid outright and checking them off, or somehow filing the clues away in memory so to make further conclusions after things start coming together...

I don't play for time that way. We may both be out of luck if trying to get the best time scores. Instead, it's as you say... fill the grid from the clues, scan for patterns, back to the remaining clues... as needed until complete.

I've enjoyed learning the techniques required to solve any puzzle. Be patient with yourself and remember it's all for fun!
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  #5  
Old 05-15-2013, 08:56 PM
jonneez jonneez is offline
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Aha, you still alive! Very good. Sometimes a problem is people kill self or murder wife when they fail to complete a puzzle. This people is very stupid. They try complete 15% puzzle when they can only do 32% puzzle.
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